Posted on Jan 12, 2018
Human Trafficking Awareness:
   Human Trafficking is a sexual slavery issue worldwide.  January is dedicated to raising awareness of the issue as it is estimated that between 21-30 million people are enslaved in the world, more than at any time in human history.  Every day, modern slavery can be recognized: children become soldiers; young women are forced into prostitution and migrant workers exploited in the workforce.  The U.S. senate designated January 11 as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day in 2007 in the hopes of raising awareness to combat human trafficking. It began as a U.S. initiative, and the United Nations has started to highlight this topic and work towards global awareness with days such as International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. 
 
Human Trafficking Awareness Facts and Quotes:
  The most common form of human trafficking is sexual exploitation, accounting for 79% if human trafficking victims.  These victims of sexual exploitation are predominantly women and girls.  According to UNICEG, 2 million children are estimated to be trafficking victims of sex trade each year.  20% of traffic victims are children.  The average age of a girl being forced into the US domestic sex slavery market is 13.  The average cost of a slave around the world is $90.00.
 
“It is slavery in the modern age.  Every year criminals who sue them for forced labor or the sex trade exploit thousands of people, mainly women and children.  No county is immune.  Almost all play a part either as a source of trafficked people, transit point or destination.”  United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki Moo
 
Here are some tips for what to do:
 Talk to children about strangers and make sure they memorize important addresses and phone numbers.
•    Save 888-373-7888 to your phone.  This is number to the National Human Trafficking Resources Hotline.
•    Make a donation to an organization such as Unisex and Polaris Project; both are fighting human trafficking.
•    Learn the signs and indicators of human trafficking so that you can learn to recognize it and report it. US Homeland Security offers a training online free of charge.
•    Watch a movie about human trafficking. Taken(2008), Trade (2007), Human Trafficking (2005), The Pink Room(2011), Nefarious (2011) and Lilya 4
•    Human Trafficking Awareness Month – January •  
 
 In support of Human Trafficking Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network offers the resources listed below to help educate child welfare professionals, families/caregivers, healthcare providers, justice system professionals, policy makers, school personnel, and survivors on the signs of trafficking and services for human trafficking survivors.
 
NCTSN Resources  {these resources can all be found on the National Child traumatic Stress website)
 
America's Child Soldiers: Gang Violence, Trafficking, & Trauma     In this webinar, Brad Stolbach and Patricia Kerig explore the conditions that contribute to youth affiliation with armed groups, including radicalized structural and economic violence, individual and community traumatization, and high-risk behavioral adaptations to chronic violence.
 
Facts for Policymakers: Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Youth (2015) (PDF) This policy brief discusses a study comparing the types of trauma exposure, trauma-related symptomatology, functional impairments, and problem behaviors of a clinical CSEC cohort (defined as youth in the CDC who reported involvement in prostitution) with a clinical group of youth who had no reported involvement in prostitution, but had a history of sexual abuse/assault.
 
Policy Brief Understanding and Addressing Trauma and Child Sex Trafficking (2017) (PDF) This policy brief provides policymakers and other stakeholders with an overview of child sex trafficking and its relationship to child trauma, as well as policy-relevant and child trauma-focused recommendations to assist them in their response to child sex trafficking. This resource was developed by the NCCTS Policy Program and Dr. Kelly Kinnish (Georgia Center for Child Advocacy), with support from the NCTSN Policy Task Force.
 
Here are some tips to help :
  • Talk to children about strangers and make sure they memorize important addresses and phone numbers.
  • Save 888-373-7888 to your phone.  This is number to the National Human Trafficking Resources Hotline.
  • Make a donation to an organization such as Unisex and Polaris Project; both are fighting human trafficking.
  • Learn the signs and indicators of human trafficking so that you can learn to recognize it and report it. US Homeland Security offers a training online free of charge.
  • Watch a movie about human trafficking.
Taken(2008), Trade (2007), Human Trafficking (2005), The Pink Room(2011), Nefarious (2011) and Lilya 4
  • Human Trafficking Awareness Month – January
  • In support of Human Trafficking Awareness Month, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network offers the resources listed below to help educate child welfare professionals, families/caregivers, healthcare providers, justice system professionals, policy makers, school personnel, and survivors on the signs of trafficking and services for human trafficking survivors.
 
     NCTSN Resources
In this webinar, Brad Stolbach and Patricia Kerig explore the conditions that contribute to youth affiliation with armed groups, including radicalized structural and economic violence, individual and community traumatization, and high-risk behavioral adaptations to chronic violence.
This policy brief discusses a study comparing the types of trauma exposure, trauma-related symptomatology, functional impairments, and problem behaviors of a clinical CSEC cohort (defined as youth in the CDC who reported involvement in prostitution) with a clinical group of youth who had no reported involvement in prostitution, but had a history of sexual abuse/assault.
 
This policy brief provides policymakers and other stakeholders with an overview of child sex trafficking and its relationship to child trauma, as well as policy-relevant and child trauma-focused recommendations to assist them in their response to child sex trafficking. This resource was developed by the NCCTS Policy Program and Dr. Kelly Kinnish (Georgia Center for Child Advocacy), with support from the NCTSN Policy Task Force.
 
 
      Polyvictimization and Sexual Exploitation of Young Girls and Women Webinar   •    In this webinar Lisa Goldblatt-Grace defines CSEC and describes the scope of the problem of the    
 commercial sexual exploitation of both girls and young women in the US. Through case examples, the presenter describes how childhood sexual abuse and other early traumas can increase risk for CSEC and complicate efforts at engagement and treatment. Polyvictimization and Sexual Exploitation of Young Girls and Women Webinar
 
Sponsors